Misoyaki Wild Salmon

Me so hungry for miso salmon.

Me so hungry for miso salmon.

This is a version of that ubiquitous sushi joint staple, misoyaki black cod, popularized with a vengeance at Matsuhisa restaurant here in LA (and at over thirty other affiliated restaurants internationally) by famed Japanese chef Nobu Matsuhisa. It’s Nobu’s signature dish, and the impact of his influence is felt in nearly every sushi bar in American, where some version of miso-marinated broiled fish is on virtually every menu. And for good reason as it’s damn good — sweet, salty, tender, and rich. It can feel fancy or it can be served very simply, almost rustically. It makes a great lunchtime or dinnertime main course, or it can go alongside other Asian dishes for a larger spread.

I love to make it with black cod, of course, or butterfish or ling cod or Chilean seabass or pretty much any other fish that is either delicate or has a decent fat content. I was initially going to make this with black cod, but I found some beautiful and very fresh wild salmon and decided to go with that instead.

I deviate from Nobu’s original recipe by adding a bit more flavoring to the marinade; if you know me you know that I can’t resist tinkering with classics in the hopes of finding greater complexity and depth of flavor — hence the addition of ginger and garlic and salt and pepper. I recommend marinating the fish for at least six hours, so make the marinade in the morning and drop the fish in. By dinnertime you’ll be good to go. If you really want to plan ahead you could marinate the salmon overnight, although I wouldn’t go for two days as the sodium in the marinade could dry out the fish and make the miso flavor too assertive.

Serve this with steamed white rice and maybe some stir-fried bok choy or other Asian greens. I also recommend having on the side a little soy sauce and something spicy like sambal oelek or sriracha.

What you need:

  • 1 pound wild salmon filet, skinned with pin-bones removed
  • 3 tablespoons mirin
  • 3 tablespoons sake
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup shiro miso paste (very pale yellow “white” miso)
  • 2 teaspoons finely minced ginger
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 2/3 cups of chopped scallions (as a garnish)

What you gotta do:

First cut the salmon filets into four evenly-sized pieces. Place the filets in a flat plastic container with a lid or a glass pan that you can cover with plastic wrap; use anything except a metal container that could be potentially reactive (i.e. aluminum). Also, choose your container wisely; you want the fish to be snug in whatever container you choose so that the fish is nestled in and covered fully by the marinade. Refrigerate fish while you make the marinade.

In a small pot mix the mirin, sake, and water. Heat over medium-high heat until boiling and add the sugar, whisking until it dissolves. Turn off the heat and whisk in the miso, ginger, garlic, salt, and white pepper. Transfer the marinade to a bowl and allow it come to room temperature. Pour marinade over the fish and turn pieces to fully coat with the miso. Cover and refrigerate.

Now wait patiently a few hours. To cook turn on your broiler and set the oven rack about six inches away from the heating element, be it flame or electric coil. Remove the fish from the marinade and place on a sheet pain that been very slightly oiled. Any excess marinade you can pour into a small pot and bring quickly to a boil. Turn off heat. Now you can use the marinade to baste the fish.

Put pan with salmon into the oven and broil for about three minutes. Remove fish from oven and, using a pastry brush, baste fish with more marinade. Return the fish to the oven and broil for another two or three minutes, approximately. You want the edges slightly charred, so when that occurs remove the salmon and prod it to check for doneness. I like it cooked through but very tender and a bit rare. Touch it with your finger — the flesh should have some softness to it. If you suspect it’s not cooked enough to your taste, turn the oven off and return the fish to oven. Allow it to cook with the oven’s residual heat until it’s firmer and more to your liking.

Transfer fish to a platter and serve dinner!

IMG_1705

Super-succulent salmon served for supper. Say that five times fast!

Green Tea Soba Noodle Salad

Light, refreshing noodle salad “japonaise”.

This is a little something I whipped up today for my own lunch. The squiggly green things are soba noodles infused with green tea, which accounts for that lovely verdant hue. I’m not really going to get into a deep, well-measured recipe, as I made this dish in an off-the-cuff fashion. But, in short, I’ll describe my method. Try to keep up.

I quickly cooked a handful of smallish peeled-and-deveined shrimp (U-31-35, if you can dig it) in approximately six cups of a quick poaching liquid made up of 70% water and 30% dry white wine with a piece of fennel, two celery stalks, a slice of white onion, a pinch of sugar, and a good amount of kosher salt (think 2 or three tablespoons). Brought it to a boil, added the shrimp, reduced heat and simmered for three minutes. Killed the heat and covered the pot for four or five minutes. I drained the shrimp and dropped them in ice water to cool completely.

While I did all that I also boiled the green tea soba noodles until al dente. I rinsed them in cool water and then drained them. I tossed the cooked noodles with a tiny bit of toasted sesame oil to keep them from sticking together and to impart some of that nutty loveliness into the noodle. I popped the noodles in the fridge for about 30 minutes to cool.

I cut the shrimp into two symmetrical halves lengthwise and chucked them in a big bowl with some of the noodles. I added a little sunflower oil, some daikon radish sprouts, some slivered fresh ginger, a bit of soy, a bit of ponzu, a couple splashes of dashi broth, a nice scattering of sesame seeds, a pinch of sugar, a little salt & pepp, some chopped green onions, a big dose of furikake, and some of these little tempura crunchies I find in the cooler at the Japanese market. I don’t know what they’re called, but I believe they are used as a sort of soup crouton. I like them in salads.

The noodle salad was fantastic! Very refreshing, super-light, and substantial. Perfect for a hot summer day.

Make this dish. If you don’t know some of the words I use above, Google ’em and figure it out! Happy cooking, y’all!

Green Tea Soba Noodle Salad

Light, refreshing noodle salad “japonaise”.

This is a little something I whipped up today for my own lunch. The squiggly green things are soba noodles infused with green tea, which accounts for that lovely verdant hue. I’m not really going to get into a deep, well-measured recipe, as I made this dish in an off-the-cuff fashion. But, in short, I’ll describe my method. Try to keep up.

I quickly cooked a handful of smallish peeled-and-deveined shrimp (U-31-35, if you can dig it) in approximately six cups of a quick poaching liquid made up of 70% water and 30% dry white wine with a piece of fennel, two celery stalks, a slice of white onion, a pinch of sugar, and a good amount of kosher salt (think 2 or three tablespoons). Brought it to a boil, added the shrimp, reduced heat and simmered for three minutes. Killed the heat and covered the pot for four or five minutes. I drained the shrimp and dropped them in ice water to cool completely.

While I did all that I also boiled the green tea soba noodles until al dente. I rinsed them in cool water and then drained them. I tossed the cooked noodles with a tiny bit of toasted sesame oil to keep them from sticking together and to impart some of that nutty loveliness into the noodle. I popped the noodles in the fridge for about 30 minutes to cool.

I cut the shrimp into two symmetrical halves lengthwise and chucked them in a big bowl with some of the noodles. I added a little sunflower oil, some daikon radish sprouts, some slivered fresh ginger, a bit of soy, a bit of ponzu, a couple splashes of dashi broth, a nice scattering of sesame seeds, a pinch of sugar, a little salt & pepp, some chopped green onions, a big dose of furikake, and some of these little tempura crunchies I find in the cooler at the Japanese market. I don’t know what they’re called, but I believe they are used as a sort of soup crouton. I like them in salads.

The noodle salad was fantastic! Very refreshing, super-light, and substantial. Perfect for a hot summer day.

Make this dish. If you don’t know some of the words I use above, Google ’em and figure it out! Happy cooking, y’all!

Kara-Age: Japanese for Fried Chicken!

Japanese-style crispy fried chicken is crazy good!

When you think of Japanese food I bet the first thing that crosses your mind is sushi. Of course sushi and sashimi are so uniquely, wonderfully, quintessentially Japanese that it’s natural for you to think first of raw fish when you think of the land of the rising sun. Maybe teriyaki, tempura, or ramen noodles also fleet across the transom of your mind. But how about fried chicken? Fried chicken, you ask skeptically, as your mind rebels? Maybe you think that fried chicken is somehow specifically American and that the Colonel (you know the one) invented it for all the world to enjoy. Well, you’re wrong. On so many levels. But if you think anything like that than you’re probably not an aficionado of this blog.

In America we have a skewed vision of what Japanese people eat daily. No, most Japanese do not subsist on raw sea urchin or blowfish entrails; only occasionally is sushi the focus. As with most people in the world they regularly eat homier, simpler fare — rice, noodles, veggies of all kinds, stews, salads, pork, and yes, fried chicken. The Japanese call it karaage or Kara-Age (pronounced kah-rah AH-geh) and it’s perhaps my favorite basic fried chicken recipe.

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